Tamara's Journeys

Journeys as great as the destinations.

Boston, Massachusetts

July 6th, 2014

The vibrant City of Boston hosts over 12 millions visitors a year, and I was one of them over the Fourth of July weekend. I wanted to spend this weekend being introduced to the Colonial Revolutionary Boston by following the Freedom Trails 16 historical sites. I saw those and so much more!

I didn't take this photo, but I wanted to share this of the 1919 Boston Molasses Flood. This molasses tank explosion killed 21 in a wave of molasses 15' high moving 30MPH in the North End of Boston. How bizarre! You wouldn't believe it if you didn't see it here.

I didn’t take this photo, but I wanted to share this of the 1919 Boston Molasses Flood. This molasses tank explosion killed 21 in a wave of molasses 15′ high moving 30MPH in the North End of Boston. How bizarre! You wouldn’t believe it if you didn’t see it here.

 

The Bell-in-Hand Tavern got its’s name from Jimmy Wilson, Boston’s last known town crier and first owner. Paul Revere was known to frequent this tavern and the only time it closed was during prohibition.

The Bell-in-Hand Tavern got its’s name from Jimmy Wilson, Boston’s last known town crier and first owner. Paul Revere was known to frequent this tavern and the only time it closed was during prohibition.

 

The Brewer Fountain in Boston Common is a one-of-a-kind bronze casting of a sculpture created for the 1855 World’s Fair in Paris that was donated to Boston by Beacon Hill merchant Gardner Brewer. It's one of many bronze sculptures around the park and city.

The Brewer Fountain in Boston Common is a one-of-a-kind bronze casting of a sculpture created for the 1855 World’s Fair in Paris that was donated to Boston by Beacon Hill merchant Gardner Brewer. It’s one of many bronze sculptures around the park and city.

The Frog Pond sits at the heart of Boston Common, the oldest  public park in the U.S. They offer ice skating in the winter and summer spray during the heat of summer.

The Frog Pond sits at the heart of Boston Common, the oldest public park in the U.S. They offer ice skating in the winter and summer spray during the heat of summer.

The Make Way for Ducklings sculpture is the Boston Public Garden's most famous attraction.   Inspired by Robert McCluskey's book, the statues of Mrs. Mallard and her 8 ducklings attract visitors from all over the world to this beautiful park in the middle of Boston.

The Make Way for Ducklings sculpture is the Boston Public Garden’s most famous attraction. Inspired by Robert McCluskey’s book, the statues of Mrs. Mallard and her 8 ducklings attract visitors from all over the world to this beautiful park in the middle of Boston.

The bronze Memorial to Robert Gould Shaw and the Massachusetts Fifty-Fourth Regiment on the edge of Boston Common. The movie Glory told his story.

The bronze Memorial to Robert Gould Shaw and the Massachusetts Fifty-Fourth Regiment on the edge of Boston Common. The movie Glory told his story.

Dating back to 1634, Boston Common is the oldest public park in the country. My ancestor Samuel Wildbore owned some of this land before leaving for Rhode Island in 1634.

Dating back to 1634, Boston Common is the oldest public park in the country. My ancestor Samuel Wildbore owned some of this land before leaving for Rhode Island in 1634.

For over 130 years, the Swan Boats have been a part of the Boston Public Garden experience. I found it relaxing to watch them come and go.

For over 130 years, the Swan Boats have been a part of the Boston Public Garden experience. I found it relaxing to watch them come and go.

Boston Garden is home to 17 time winners Boston Celtics and 6 time winners Boston Bruins. Beside the Gardens is the James Kelly Bridge.

Boston Garden is home to 17 time winners Boston Celtics and 6 time winners Boston Bruins. Beside the Gardens is the James Kelly Bridge.

The Boston Harbor Hotel is a high-end luxury hotel overlooking Boston Harbor. I felt moved by their flag.

The Boston Harbor Hotel is a high-end luxury hotel overlooking Boston Harbor. I felt moved by their flag.

Inspired by a group of Holocaust survivors who found new lives in the Boston area, the New England Holocaust Memorial was built to foster reflection on the impact of bigotry and the outcomes of evil during World War II and to this day.

Inspired by a group of Holocaust survivors who found new lives in the Boston area, the New England Holocaust Memorial was built to foster reflection on the impact of bigotry and the outcomes of evil during World War II and to this day.

Boston Holocaust Memorial

The Holocaust Memorial is built primarily of granite and glass, and consists of six luminous towers lit internally to gleam at night. The number six recalls the millions of Jews killed in the Holocaust; a row of memorial candles; the six main death camps; and the six years, 1939-1945, during which the infamous “Final Solution,” the most deadly phase of the Holocaust, took place.

Boston Massacre Site

This Boston Massacre marker marks the site of the killing of five colonists by British regulars on March 5, 1770. The senseless loss of lives is said to be the spark that ignited the Revolutionary War.

Boston Opera House exterior

This Boston Opera House was originally built as a movie palace in 1928. I walked past it several times and never tired of looking up at it’s beauty.

Boston New State House

The “New” State House, is the state capitol and house of government of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. In front of the building is an equestrian statue of General Joseph Hooker. Good at soldiering, not so good at monogamy, he is where we get the term hooker from.

Boston Opera House Lobby

Boston Opera House beautiful lobby.

Boston Tea Party Boat

I didn’t make it through the Boston Tea Party museum, but this is the boat used to re-enact the “tea-crisis” of 1773. I heard it is very well done and worth the time. I’ll have to try on the next visit to Boston.

Bunker Hill Monument Precott Statue

This is a bronze likeness of General Prescott. Prescott gave the famous command “Don’t fire until I tell you! Don’t fire till you see the whites of their eyes!,” to preserve precious gunpowder.

Bunker Hill Monument

Bunker Hill Monument is actually on Breed’s Hill, but it’s joked about that the men didn’t ask directions before heading into battle. It’s 221 1/6 feet high, and 6,700 tons of granite was used in its construction. The monument is 30 feet square at the base and I didn’t make all 296 steps to the top. The National Park Service guides were very informative and animated here.

Custom House Clock Tower

The Custom House Tower is now part of the Marriott Hotel. The four clock faces have never been in sink, causing locals to call it the four-faced liar.

Boston's Chinatown Gate

Boston’s Chinatown is the third largest in the United States, behind New York and San Francisco.

Faneuil Hall

Faneuil Hall has served as a marketplace and a meeting hall since 1742. Funding was provided by a wealthy merchant, Peter Faneuil, for the construction and local artisan to create the grasshopper (yes, I wrote grasshopper) weather vane that still perches on the building’s cupola. Inspirational speeches by Samuel Adams and other patriots were given at Faneuil Hall. These oratories became the footstool for America’s desire to obtain independence from the British. Not only that, but more people visit Faneuil Hall then visit Disney World each year!

First Public School Benjamin Franklin Statue

The first public school in America was established by Puritan settlers in 1635. This statue of Benjamin Franklin overlooks the former site where Franklin, Samuel Adams, and John Hancock once attended.

Filene's Department Store

Filene’s Department Store Building built in 1912 in Beaux-Art style.

Flour and Grain Exchange Building with Customs House in Background

The Flour and Grain Exchange Building is a very beautiful granite structure of Romanesque architecture, located near the Custom House tower, which you can see in the background. I wish I could have gotten better details in the photo because it is exceptional.

Genneros Restaurant

Gennaro’s 5 North Square Restaurant in the North End beside the Paul Revere house.

Fisherman's Wharf and No Name Restaurant

No Name Restaurant on Fish Wharf. Note the fishing boats lined up on the left of the wharf. The No Name got its name just after opening, in 1917. Fisherman docking from shifts would wander to a nearby fish stand and ask the proprieter, Nick Contos, what his place was called. “No Name, come eat” he’d say. It stuck.

Granary Burial Ground John Hancock

John Hancock burial site at the Granary Burying Ground. It’s the largest and kinda resembles a …

Granary Burial Ground Paul Revere

Paul Revere’s final resting spot at the Granary Burying Ground.

Glass Harmonica Player

A woman playing the Glass Harmonica outside Paul Revere’s house.

Granary Burial Ground Samuel Adams

Samuel Adams headstone at the Granary Burying Ground. Samuel Adams was an American statesman, political philosopher, and one of the Founding Fathers of the United States

HI Boston Hostel

HI Boston Hostel where I stayed for two nights. The best hostel I’ve stayed at to date.

Irish Famine Memorial

The Irish Famine Memorial in which the first sculpture depicts a starving woman, looking up to the heavens as if to ask “Why?”, while her children cling to her. A second sculpture shows the figures hopeful as they land in Boston.

King's Chapel Burial Ground headstone

Most of the headstones at King’s Chapel Burying Ground had skeletons on them.

Mike's Pastry

Mike’s Pastry heaven in the North End. I had been told not to miss this treat, and I’m glad I listened. Me and my co-workers enjoyed the cannolis, lobstertails and ricotta pie this morning. Don’t miss this bakery!

lightship Nantucket

The Lightship Nantucket guided transoceanic shipping to and from U.S. east coast ports, through some of the most treacherous shipping lanes in the world. It’s now being preserved in Boston.

Old North Church Organ

The Old North church’s first organ was installed in 1736. The organ has been rebuilt several times, but a number of components from the original remain.

Old North Church Memorial Garden

Boston’s latest tribute and respect given to our troops who have recently sacrificed their lives for our freedoms, “The Old North Church Memorial Garden”. There are hundreds of nameless dog tags representing their fallen heroes of loved ones lost in the Iraq and Afghanistan wars.

Old North Church St. Francis

St. Francis statue at the Old North Church.

Old South Meeting House

Since 1729, when it was built as a Puritan meeting house, Old South Meeting House has played an important role in American history. It was on this site that the Judge Samuel Sewall publically apologized for his role in the Salem Witch Trials. It was on this site that Benjamin Franklin was baptized. It was on this site that slave and poet Phillis Wheatley explored the meaning of liberty. It was also on this site where a meeting on December 16, 1773, which adjourned to Griffin’s Wharf for the infamous event that would become known as the Boston Tea Party.

Old State House

The Old State House was the center of all political life and debate in colonial Boston. On July 18, 1776, citizens gathered in the street to hear the Declaration of Independence read from the building’s balcony, the first public reading in Massachusetts. I couldn’t believe I was standing at the very spot where others stood before me to hear it read. It makes you think.

Old North Church Pulpit and Alter

Old North Church Pulpit and Alter

Paramont Theater

Originally a 1930s cinema palace, the Paramount Theater had closed in 1976, and reopened in 2010 with lively Art Deco style and 596 seats.

Paul Revere and Old North Church

Paul Revere and Old North Church. Known as “Christ Church in the City of Boston”, this Episcopal church was built in 1723 and is Boston’s oldest Church building. On the steeple of this church, Robert Newman signaled with lanterns the approach of the British regulars; “One if by land, and two, if by sea”. And Paul Revere was one of the neighborhood bell ringers.

Omni Parker House Hotel

The Omni Parker House Hotel that created the Boston crème Pie and famous Parker House Rolls.

Paul Revere Statue

Did you know Paul Revere’s horse was names Brown Beauty?

Paul Revere House

Paul Revere’s House was also brown. Very brown.

Quincy Market

Quincy Market was the first open market complex, built in 1824. I was told more people visit here every year than visit Walt Disney World. However by the time you purchase a couple lobster rolls, you could have gone to Disney World!

Regina Pizzeria inside Quincy Market

Regina Pizzeria has been serving pizza since 1926 and they’ve got it down. This was wonderful pizza!!

Rose Kennedy Garden Roses

The Rose Kennedy Memorial Rose Garden has 104 rose bushes, one for each year of her life.

Saus and Holocaust Memorial

The Saus restaurant windows reflecting the Holocaust Memorial. Loved their frites and saus.

South Station

The historic South Station was built in1899 to replace the downtown terminals of several railroads. Today, it serves as a major intermodal domestic transportation hub, with service to the Greater Boston region and the Midwestern and Northeastern United States.

The Freedom Trail Sign

The Freedom Trail Sign

The Union Oyster House and Bar

The Union Oyster House and Baris the oldest restaurant in Boston and the oldest restaurant in continuous service in the U.S. — the doors have always been open to diners since 1826.

Tremont Temple Baptist Church Organ

Tremont Temple Baptist Church Organ

Tremont Temple Baptist Church

Since the 1830’s the Tremont Temple Baptist Church has been a leader in the Boston area for social justice, evangelism, and human rights. It’s members fought for abolition of slavery. At the time other churches charged for pew space, and the Temple was FREE for all. Throughout its history many famous individuals spoke or performed here, including Abraham Lincoln. The first reading in Boston of the Emancipation Proclamation of 1863 took place here. Charles Dickens read for the first time in Boston his famous Christmas Carol here. And Dwight L. Moody called the church “America’s pulpit.”

USS Constitution and Bunker Hill Memorial

USS Constitution and Bunker Hill Memorial

USS Constitution Rigging

The USS Constitution is the oldest commissioned warship afloat in the world. It was first launched in 1797. The ships greatest glory came during the war of 1812 when she defeated four British frigates which earned her the nickname “Old Ironsides,” because cannon balls glanced off her thick hull.

USS Cassin Young

The USS Cassin Young survived two separate hits by Japanese kamikazes in Okinawa. Although the second attack, on July 30, 1945, killed 22 and wounded twice as many and totally disabled the ship, the heroic efforts of her crew saved the ship.

130702-N-SU274-047

To maintain active duty the USS Constitution must go out 1 mile 3 times a year. She does this on the Fourth of July and fires a 21 gun salute and comes back in, turned the opposite direction for weathering purposes.

 

 

Comments

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  • Richard says on: July 7, 2014 at 11:06 am

     

    Love Boston. Spent a few days there several years ago and saw a lot of the city. However, I did not see as much as you did as I look at all the great pictures you took. I thought at least there would be a picture of you which would have made the viewing better but I was left with just the statues.
    Hope you are well and doing good.

    • Tamara says on: July 7, 2014 at 3:35 pm

       

      Thanks for the kind words Richard. I LOVED Boston and would enjoy returning to visit the museums. This time I went with the purpose of walking the Freedom Trail for the Fourth of July. Since I travel alone I would have to trust someone with my phone to take my photo. I’m not good at “selfie” photos. Have a great day!

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Tamara's Journeys

Journeys as great as the destinations.