Tamara's Journeys

Journeys as great as the destinations.

Friday Funnies

May 27th, 2016

Contrary to how I felt after my TRX workout Monday, I don’t believe exercise has to hurt to be beneficial. Honestly! I suggest before you put on your jogging suit and shoes to workout, you read some of these exercise jokes:

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Q: What do you get if you run in front of a car? A: Tired! Q: What do you get if you run behind a car? A: Exhausted!

Need exercise? Yoga class is great. You can close your eyes and imagine yourself in a relaxing place. Like on your couch not doing Yoga. (I love that one!)

You know that you’re out of shape when you can’t pull supermarket shopping carts apart. I needed exercise.

So, a long time ago I joined a health club on an exercise special, I spent about $19 every month and haven’t lost an inch. Apparently you have to show up. Why didn’t somebody tell me that?

Before long I quickly realized I prefer sit-ups to jumping jacks. At least I get to lie down after each one.

One last thought: Don’t forget, your brain needs exercise, too. So, spend lots of time lying down thinking up excuses for not working with your therapist.

Now that you’re rested, get your shoes on and more your body!

I Never Thought I’d See the Day

May 25th, 2016

So Peter was kept in prison, but the Church was earnestly praying for him. Acts 12:5

For decades now Christian weddings have been conducted outside the four walls of a church. Not that there’s anything wrong with that. It’s God who sanctifies marriages, not religious buildings. But, such trends are just one of the signs of the increasingly optional status of the Church in American society. Whereas community churches used to be considered a course of life and light, increasingly their light has grown dimmer when it comes to their connection with life’s most serious moments. Many people view churches as having little to say that is more relevant than what can be found on talks shows or in Internet advice columns. And so they stay away.

So what is the Church? Often people confuse “Church” with “church” the former being the universal body of believers in Christ; the latter being a building constructed for the purpose of the Church meeting together for worship, instruction, service and fellowship. That confusion developed easily in America where churches have proliferated. Many New England towns and villages are characterized by churches built hundreds of years ago as our nation was settled.

In the New Testament the Greek word for church is ekklesia, which means “called out ones” Ekklesia referred to any assembly of people who were called together for a particular purpose and the New Testament writers applied this term to those called together by God. And every time it’s used, it always refers to people, not buildings. The great English Bible translator William Tyndale wisely sought to avoid the confusion between “Church” and “church” by translating ekklesia as “congregation” instead of “church”. Interesting. That means when Christians ask whether or not the Church is having an impact on the world, we only have to look in the mirror.

In early church history the Church had met in homes, in public places and other settings. It wasn’t until the Roman Church began building churches throughout Europe that the “church building” began. That’s when the Church became institutionalized and tied to its property.

I’m not “anti-church building”. Don’t take this that way. I believe buildings play a role in the success of the Church. All the benefits that accrue to a nuclear family from having a physical structure to call home apply to church families as well. Church buildings allow the Church to gather for worship and fellowship, while discipleship is best accomplished outside the walls of the building.

The point I’m getting to is this: We must maintain a clear understanding of the difference between Church and church. The priority of the former over the latter. Keeping focus on people is the biblical priority and will result in the Church’s remaining relevant.

May God grant His Church the discipline to stay focused and the desire to manifest the eternal relevance of Christ to a needy world. Amen

 

The Nice Guys

May 22nd, 2016

From all the positive reviews I was looking forward to watching The Nice Guys. Boy. what a letdown. Take the popular buddy movies of the 80’s, add the retro good vibes of the 70’s and quickly stir in the grisly blood, violence and vulgarity of the 90’s and voila!…you have the half-baked movie I saw today. To any unsuspecting moviegoer sitting through this dreadful movie, the age-old adage, nice guys finish last, becomes all too true. Wish I had walked out a little earlier and enjoyed a cat video instead of spending my time on this trashy film. Have reviewing standards really slipped this far?

Granted, I’m not a professional movie reviewer by any means. But I felt like I needed to take a shower after watching these “nice guys.” I enjoy both of these actors so when I saw the trailer I thought it might work. Together, the two leads have zero chemistry between them, a grave sin in a buddy film.

One star is higher than I would give it. Why actors as talented as Russel Crowe (who looked bloated like a blimp) and Ryan Gosling would lower themselves to be part of trash like this is beyond me. And how many hours did Ryan Gosling watch Dean Martin/Jerry Lewis’ shtick to get his part. This film was such a waste of talent.

The Nice Guys was vulgar, profane and the acting was only slightly better than bad. Their so-called comedy bits are labored and bereft of humor. But even worse is that I paid to see it. Maybe so you don’t have to. Save your money and feel sorry for the young actress who had to endure being a part of this low-life movie.

The Nice Guys are dumb as rocks and they’re miserable company. Stay home and watch cat videos.

 

Friday Funnies

May 20th, 2016

Customer service can range from wonderful to incredibly frustrating to just plain funny no matter where you are, just try to keep your sense of humor and go with it.

I overheard a patient at the nursing station returning a package of Depends that were too small and tight. “Was anything wrong with them?” the CNA asked. “Yes,” the patient said. “They hurt my feelings.”

Patient: Ick! Why does this sandwich have bacon on it? Staff: You ordered a BLT. Patient: Whaaaat? I thought the B stood for bread.

While I was out to lunch, my coworker answered my phone and told the caller that I would be back in 20 minutes. The woman calling from the U.P. asked, 
“Is dat 20 minutes Central Standard Time?”

When asked for his name by the barista, my friend answered, “Marc, with a C.” Minutes later, he was handed his coffee with his name written on the side: Cark.

As the CNA at the assisted living facility showed me to my table, I asked her to keep an eye out for my husband, who would be joining me. I started to describe him: “He has gray hair, wears glasses, has a little potbelly …” She stopped me there. “Honey,” she said, “today is senior day. They all look like that.”

 

 

 

I Never Thought I’d See the Day

May 18th, 2016

All Scripture is God-breathed and is useful for teaching, rebuking, correcting and training in righteousness, so that the servant of God may be thoroughly equipped for every good work. 2 Timothy 3:16-17

Something has happened in America that seems unthinkable to me. When I was a girl in school biblical principles had a strong influence on lessons and in society. It’s not that everyone was religious, but there was a respect for the Bible and biblical principles were evident in our culture from lunch hour Bible study, history class and TV programs at the time.

I know that our President has declared that America is no longer a Christian nation. I agree with our Founding Fathers that no religion should be legally sanctioned by our government. However, I believe a nation’s wellbeing depends on objective knowledge of God’s truth. Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Jefferson acknowledged Biblical values in a healthy society. Since that time the Bible has been downgraded from being taught to being virtually banned in public. The Bible has become a relic of history, a negative cultural icon used to illustrate the narrow-mindedness of our nation’s founders.

As much as I hate to believe it, public school and venues aren’t the only places in which the Bible’s status is being diluted. It’s even happening in the Christian Church itself. The church that should stand firm and have a positive effect on society, has allowed itself to be affected by today’s culture. Which brings me to my primary concern which is: As goes the culture, very often goes the church.

I’ve been told I shouldn’t be too surprised that America is drifting away from God’s truth. After all history shows that nations tend to do that. But, I never thought I’d see the day when the Bible would be marginalized not only in American culture, but even marginalized in the church. Pushed to the edge in public education and out of the decision-making processes of our government decision makers. Those who honor the Bible are tolerated as long as our biblical principles don’t spill over into public activity.

Professing Christians represent a strong majority of the nation’s population, yet the Bible they depend on as the sole source of information about their faith is being made irrelevant. How does that work? I can only guess that many Christians are being drawn into the values of an increasingly secular culture which is imposing its negative influence on their values and diluting allegiance to the Bible.

I’ve even witnessed Christians that are ashamed to be identified as believers because they seem to be confused. They seem to think that belief requires blind faith, while disbelief comes from intellectual analysis and they don’t want to lose intellectual credibility in the eyes of others. Intimidated by atheists.

Finally, I’ve attended churches across America that seem to marginalize the Bible because of ongoing pressure for attendance and dollars. I said it. It’s true, when it comes to attracting people, more and more, churches find themselves competing with America’s entertainment culture.

Pastors today are often judged more on their ability to make a congregation laugh and enjoy the assembly than on the biblical content of their sermon. Not that there’s anything wrong with laughing in church. My concern is that we stray to these gimmicks that leave little time for actual teaching and preaching the Word and the truth contained only in the Bible. The only way to counteract such chaos is to restore the Bible to its rightful place in our churches so members will restore it to the center of their lives and reflect its principles in our culture. Churches must play a pivotal role in whether the Bible is pushed to the margins or elevated to the center of our culture. What adults see prioritized in their church will influence the priorities they pass on to the next generation.

Pray that God will restore our wonder in the astounding fact that the Creator of heaven and earth loves us so dearly that He gave us His loving and guiding Word, which gives us knowledge of His amazing sacrifice and draws us toward Him and His redeeming love. If enough Christians restore the Bible our nation and its culture may yet be transformed.

 

Sunday In Nevada

May 15th, 2016

Tuscarora had a rather unique beginning. Unique in the sense that it took almost ten years after the first gold discoveries were made before the town began to grow. Gold was discovered in 1867, but nothing much happened until 1869 when the first Chinese move into the area. By the end of the year more than 200 Chinese miners had arrived and formed a Chinatown adjacent to the Tuscarora camp.

In 1870, Tuscarora had a population of 119 of which 104 were Chinese and 15 were white. During the early 1870s, the frustrated white miners left and began prospecting the nearby hills. Silver was discovered and Tuscarora became a silver mining town. Suddenly Tuscarora became the place to be.

At the peak of Tuscarora’s prosperity, it had about 3300 inhabitants, 1800 of which were on the payrolls of the mines. There were two large boarding houses in the place, two good-sized hotels, several general stores, saloons, a drug store, a jewelry store, a gun shop, and enough houses to comfortably care for the population. There were enough mills to take care of the ore mined, the largest of which was the Union Mill built in 1883, and which, because wood was scarce, used sage brush for fuel to fire its huge boilers and develop steam and power. And they had plenty of sage brush!

The two most productive years were 1878 and 1879. In each of those years, Tuscarora’s mines yielded more than $1 million worth of bullion. But fires that had spared the town during the first few years of its existence began to plague to town.

During the mid-1880s, the big mines began to play out and the population slipped to less than 1,000. The town continued to suffer and many businesses closed their doors. The stage coaches were full leaving town and empty upon their return. It’s estimated that the mines of Tuscarora produced about $40 million in bullion.

Today, Tuscarora is classified as a ghost town although there are a few unique minded people still living there. Artists, photographers and those just seeking solitude live here among the ruins, chasing away the ghosts from this old Nevada boomtown. For the life of me I can’t figure out why. Tuscarora is a strange, odd creepy dilapidated town snack in the middle of nowhere with a few stairs that lead to nowhere and nothing but sagebrush and cattle for miles and miles.

I enjoyed a memorable scenic drive full of sharp turns over a mountain pass with the added bonus of dodging cattle. Today I had a unique adventure!

Tuscarora 1 Tuscarora 2 Tuscarora 4 Tuscarora 5 Tuscarora 6 Tuscarora 7 Tuscarora 8 Tuscarora 9 Tuscarora 10 Tuscarora 11 Tuscarora Independence Mill

Friday Funnies

May 13th, 2016

This week at my facility was celebrated with a different theme each day, including disco, sports and western so I decided we needed some jokes to match those themes this week:

Why did the skeleton go to the disco? He heard it was a hip joint.

Q: What do cars so at the disco? A: Brake dance

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The other day was Take Your Daughter to Work day. The Cubs had a fun time, played a little scrimmage against their daughters. Unfortunately, they lost, 15-3.

A rookie pitcher was struggling at the mound, so the catcher walked up to have a talk with him. “I’ve figured out your problem,” he told the young southpaw. “You always lose control at the same point in every game.” “When is that?” “Right after the National Anthem.”

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A sheriff in a small town sees a tall attractive “Blonde” cowboy walking down the sidewalk in Elko wearing nothing but a cowboy hat, jeans and cowboy boots. Naturally the sheriff arrested him and put him in jail charging Indecent Exposure. As the sheriff is about to leave the jail, he turns and asks the Cowboy, ” Why in the world were you walking around in town like that?” The cowboy says, ” Well, I was in this bar when this really good looking lady came up to me, took me by the arm and took me out to her motor home. She took off her top and asked me to take off mine. So I did. She got on the bed and said, “OK cowboy now ‘go to town.’” So I did!

Wow. Keep your shirt on!

I Never Thought I’d See the Day

May 11th, 2016

You are the salt of the earth. But if the salt loses its saltiness, how can it be made salty again? It is no longer good for anything, except to be thrown out and trampled underfoot. “You are the light of the world. A town built on a hill cannot be hidden. Neither do people light a lamp and put it under a bowl. Instead they put it on its stand, and it gives light to everyone in the house. In the same way, let your light shine before others, that they may see your good deeds and glorify your Father in heaven. Matthew 5:13-16

I never thought I’d see the day when America’s moral compass would lose its orientation. But it’s happened. Our moral compass seems to have lost its “true north.” The needle spins crazily, looking for a direction that can lead our nation on a path of integrity and morality.

We have a serious problem in this country. It’s as if immorality is in the water we drink and the air we breathe. We’re no longer surprised by coaches, when millions of dollars hang in the balance, sometimes choose to postpone a player’s discipline when their player is caught in an immoral situation. I’m not picking on athletes; it also occurs openly among high government officials. Add to that issues of human trafficking and child pornography in this country and I wonder if America can sink any lower.

The necessity of morality is more critical in America than in any other society because we have more freedom. Yet as America leans more toward humanism, the standards for morals and ethics are up for grabs from the lawmakers. And unlike the American moral code, which is based on ever-changing laws, the Christian code of morals and ethics is found unchanging in the Bible. So it’s difficult to see how Christians could claim lack of clarity on moral issues.

I’m not saying America is a completely immoral, out-of-control society, but more and more we’re choosing to live with certain areas of immorality. We’ve allowed ourselves to go “this far”, which would have been thought unthinkable not so long ago. If we don’t draw a line in the sand and start closing the morality gap, the consequences are going to be impossible to imagine.

Did you ever imagine that we would live in a time like today? Every time you turn on the TV there are so many violations of God’s absolute moral code being committed openly and without shame and even legitimized by lawmakers. Do not be disheartened. Historically Christians have lived in a hostile world. This is just another example.

That’s why we, as Christians, are instructed to be as salt and light. To live in such a way that we respect God’s morality and in ways that demonstrate His nature to a wayward and searching world. What are you waiting for?

Mother’s Day Movie Review

May 8th, 2016

Finally, a decent movie to watch, without violence-stress-nudity and full of heartfelt moments with humor. I really appreciate there are still lighthearted movies like Mother’s Day when I just want to relax. This movie is very funny and has lots of funny, entertaining lines to laugh about later. I don’t understand the rude reviews and the harsh comments.

Mother’s Day hits all the emotional buttons of contemporary mothers everywhere. In some ways, perhaps too well, while revealing much of what most Americans experience but hide and avoid talking or feeling about. Garry Marshall (of Happy Days and Laverne & Shirley) has once again created fabulous comedy-drama that somehow in spite of all the various characters the story lines remain believable and entertaining.

This movie taps into many of the hidden difficulties of being both a female and a mother and acknowledges their wonderful and vital contribution to humanity. By tapping into the female psyche, Mother’s Day is a tribute to better, quality movies so sorely under-rated by the male film industry and critics that can’t comprehend what this movie is really about.

The cast has good natural chemistry with each other. I really liked Jennifer Aniston in this, she is funny, looks great for 48, and has good chemistry with Timothy Olaphant, who plays her ex-husband. Julia Roberts, in spite of her Pretty Woman hairdo, has a well written character and definitely has the deepest character development. Kate Hudson is pretty funny and entertaining too. Jennifer Garner makes a very brief cameo, which is a nice touching scene.

Mother’s Day isn’t meant to be an Oscar nominee. But it isn’t crude, offensive or inappropriate for families and that says a lot to me about Gary Marshall and his movies. I think we need more movies about real families with different problems, life issues, family bonds and humor. I recommend Mother’s Day as a good choice for a “feel good” evening.

 

 

 

Friday Funnies

May 6th, 2016

I had to stop driving my car for a while… The tires got dizzy. Or was that me that was dizzy? It’s been me ever since I returned from Salt Lake City. I’m going to focus on making vertigo funny.

A man told the doctor he had severe neck pains, throbbing headaches, and dizzy spells. After a thorough examination, the doctor said there was no mistake about it — he had only two months to live. The doomed man decided to spend all his money and enjoy his remaining life. First, he’d get something he always longed for — a dozen tailor-made silk shirts. While measuring him, the tailor said, “That’s a size 17 neck.” “Hold on,” said the man, “I wear a 15 1/2.” The tailor re-measured the man’s neck and said, “You’re definitely size 17.” The man insisted, “I’m a 15 1/2. I always wear a 15 1/2, and that’s what I want.” “Okay,” said the tailor, “but if you wear a 15 1/2, you’ll have severe neck pains, throbbing headaches, and dizzy spells.”

“Now, Ms. Lyons,” said the doctor, “you say you have shooting pains in your neck, dizziness, and constant nausea. Just for the record, how old are you?” “Why, I’m going to be 29 on my next birthday,” the woman replied indignantly. “Hmmm,” muttered the doctor as he spoke into his recorder, “Pt exhibits a slight loss of memory with dizziness.”

Personal ad in Delray Beach newspaper: Long-term Commitment: Recent Widow Who Has Just Buried Fourth Husband Looking for Someone to Round out a Six-Unit Plot. Dizziness, Fainting, Shortness of Breath Not a Problem.

As long as the world is spinning we’re going to be dizzy. Try to have fun with it.

Sunday in Utah

May 2nd, 2016

This weekend I crossed the border and discovered Salt Lake City. I’m so glad I did because Salt Lake is a community with an appreciation for the arts, history, education, architecture, an emphasis on healthy outdoor living and family oriented activities. I can’t wait to share this wonderful experience with you.

Hundreds of years ago the Ute Tribe, from which the state takes its name, and the Navajo Indians lived in this region before Mormon pioneers arrived. The pioneers, led by Brigham Young, were the first non-Indians to settle permanently in the Salt Lake Valley. The group consisted of a mere 143 men, three women, and two children. The Mormons came to the valley in search of a region where they could practice their religion, free from hostile mobs and persecution. When Brigham Young first saw the valley he said, “This is the place.”

"This is the Place" marker

“This is the Place” marker

"This is the Place"

“This is the Place”

It’s said that on their very day of arrival the pioneers began tilling the soil and planting crops. The following Spring plague of crickets nearly destroyed the harvest. Flocks of seagulls consumed the crickets and enough of the crop was saved to enable the settlers to survive. In gratitude, the seagull was later designated Utah’s state bird.

The Seagull Monument located on Temple Square, is a tribute to the history behind the state bird of Utah

The Seagull Monument located on Temple Square, is a tribute to the history behind the state bird of Utah

I began my day at Temple Square, home of the Temple. Dedicated in 1893, the Salt Lake Temple, the sixth and largest temple completed by the LDS church, required 40 years to complete. The Salt Lake Temple is the centerpiece of the tranquil and beautifully landscaped 10-acre Temple Square and is considered so sacred that few members (and no public) are permitted to enter.

Salt Lake City Mormon Temple

Salt Lake City Mormon Temple

I visited the dome-shaped Tabernacle, which is so acoustically sensitive that a pin dropped at the pulpit can be clearly heard at the back of the hall, 170 feet away, is home to the world-famed Mormon Tabernacle Choir and one of the world’s great musical instruments, a magnificent pipe organ with 11,623 pipes. I can’t believe I’ve been lucky enough to seen them twice. It’s an extraordinary experience. To watch the May 1st performance I attended: https://www.mormontabernaclechoir.org/content/motab/en/videos/may-1-2016-music-and-the-spoken-word.html

Mormon Tabernacle dome

Mormon Tabernacle dome

Temple Square

Temple Square

Along Temple Rd, but still part of Temple Square is The Beehive House. Built in the Temple Square between 1853 and 1855 and served as home to Brigham Young when he was President of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and governor of the Utah Territory.

The Beehive House

The Beehive House

Next door is The Lion House built in 1856 by Brigham Young. The home derives its name from the stone lion statue resting over the front entrance. “Lion of the Lord” was Brigham Young’s nickname. The home now houses The Lion House Pantry Restaurant which was sadly closed when I was there.

The Lion House

The Lion House

Salt Lake began to assume its present cosmopolitan character in the early 1900s. The State Capitol and many other historic buildings were constructed.

The Capitol Theatre is one of Salt Lake County’s most beloved, and a personal favorite, buildings. A landmark in downtown Salt Lake since 1913. It’s for its elegant turn-of-the century architecture and serves as the home for Ballet West, Utah Opera, Children’s Dance Theatre, and Broadway Across America -Utah.

Capitol Theater

Capitol Theater

For more than 150 years, the Eagle Gate has been one of downtown Salt Lake City’s most prominent landmarks. Eagle Gate, which had served to mark the entrance to Brigham Young’s estate, was reconstructed to allow traffic flow.

Eagle Gate Monument with Capitol in the disstance

Eagle Gate Monument with Capitol in the distance

The Emanuel Kahn House build in 1889, now operates as the Anniversary Inn Bed and Breakfast. It’s significant to Salt Lake City history because Kahn, an immigrant from Germany, was one of the first Jewish merchants in Utah. And it’s also significant as an outstanding Queen Anne style house build by one of the first “Gentile” (non-Mormon) architects in Utah.

Emanuel Kahn House

Emanuel Kahn House

Built in 1902 by the prominent mining magnate, U.S. Senator Thomas Kearns, this elegant and opulent home was donated to the state in 1937. The mansion has been restored to its decorative 1902 original style and serves as Utah’s Governor’s Mansion.

Governors Mansion

Governors Mansion

The David Keith Mansion and Carriage House was built during 1898-1900. Keith started his life as a miner in Nova Scotia before traveling to California and becoming friends with Thomas Kearns. In Salt Lake Keith owned and operated The Salt Lake Tribune and lived in the magnificent mansion until 1916. A day after his death, a Salt Lake Tribune editorial praised Keith as “one of that mighty company of daring men with vision who unlocked the treasures of the west and built an empire unsurpassed even by the dreams of romance.”

David Keith Mansion

David Keith Mansion

A favorite of my tour guide, The historic McCune Mansion in Salt Lake City was completed at a cost of $1,000,000.00 in 1901 by entrepreneur and railroad tycoon Alfred W. McCune as his family home. When the McCune Family decided to move his large family to Los Angeles in 1920, they donated the Mansion to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, which, in turn, used it to establish the McCune School of Music. Today the McCune Mansion offers a stunning setting for weddings, anniversaries, celebrations, board meetings, retreats and other important occasions.

Mccune Mansion

Mccune Mansion

Built in 1927, the Salt Lake Masonic Temple is the Masonic headquarters for Utah, and is Salt Lake City’s best example of Egyptian Revival Architecture which was in the height of fashion at the time.

Masonic Temple

Masonic Temple

Before long, other religions found Great Salt Lake. The Cathedral of the Madeleine is a Roman Catholic church in Salt Lake City.  It was completed in 1909 and currently serves as the mother church of the Diocese of Salt Lake City. The cathedral combines a predominately Romanesque exterior with a Gothic interior and is listed on the Utah Register of Historic Sites and the National Register of Historic Places.

Cathedral of the Madeline 1

Cathedral of the Madeline 1

Cathedral of the Madeline

Cathedral of the Madeline

Not to be left out, Daniel S. Tuttle, a native of New York state, was elected by the Episcopal Church to be missionary bishop to the new territory of Montana with jurisdiction in areas that later became the states of Utah and Idaho.  He arrived in Salt Lake City July 2, 1867 and began to build a congregation. Built in 1871, St. Mark’s Episcopal Cathedral is the third oldest Episcopal Cathedral in the United States and the second oldest continuously used worship building in Utah.

Cathedral of St. Mark

Cathedral of St. Mark

First Presbyterian Church of Salt Lake City, Utah, was organized in 1873. The present church structure, built in 1903, was restored in 2003.

First Presbyterian Church of Salt Lake City, Utah, was organized in 1873. The present church structure, built in 1903, was restored in 2003.

We ended the tour at the state capitol. For nearly a century, the State Capitol has been one of Utah’s most prominent landmarks. Designed by local architect Richard K. A. Kletting, the Capitol has been home to state government since its opening in 1916. From 2004 to 2008, the Utah State Capitol underwent one of the largest historical preservation projects to restore the magnificent artwork and safe-guard the building against the risk of an earthquake.

Four lions were sculpted from Italian marble by Nick Fairplay, master carver. This is named "Fortitude."

Four lions were sculpted from Italian marble by Nick Fairplay, master carver. This is named “Fortitude.”

View from the capital steps

View from the capital steps

State Capital spring flowers

State Capital spring flowers

That seal floor piece commemorating the 100th year anniversary of the State Capitol building

That seal floor piece commemorating the 100th year anniversary of the State Capitol building

State Capital 1 State Capital 2

Between 1900-1930, the city’s population nearly tripled. The downtown skyline changed again in the 1990s when the Salt Palace Convention Center was rebuilt and continued when Salt Lake hosted the Olympic Winter Games in February 2002. The largest city ever to host the winter games, many of the venues are still in place and available for the public to enjoy and relive Olympic memories. I need to return for an Olympic tour. (Fun fact: They’re talking about putting in another Olympic bid)

Many of the Salt Palace Convention center’s most striking visual features are obtained through the creative use of hollow structural steel in exposed applications. I loved the entrance towers, delicate snowflake chandeliers, a red Chihuly against a gold-leaf staircase and the grand five-story main concourse. This convention center is really modern art sculpture.

Windmills cause chimes to sound in 5 story entryway. I loved it

Windmills cause chimes to sound in 5 story entryway. I loved it

Salt Palace Chihuly and Gold Leaf Staircase

Salt Palace Chihuly and Gold Leaf Staircase

I was thrilled everything I saw and can’t wait to return to this beautiful cosmopolitan city in the mountains.

Tamara's Journeys

Journeys as great as the destinations.